picture

Go Wizardry

All About the Many Aspects of Go
We have millions of friends around the world... and they all play go!

Professional Perception

image

After subscribing to Kido (棋道) magazine for many years, I ended up with a large number of pocket-sized booklets, at least a hundred or so, on all sorts of subjects. My favorites were the ones where top players would analyze their own games, often in a test format. I recently looked over a few of these booklets and was surprised at how my perception differed from the professionals’. I wonder if readers would find the same thing. I will translate the first few problems and the answers to show what I mean. The booklet concludes with game records giving all the moves and I will include those as well, so that readers are not left high and dry.

Gosei Tournament, Round 3

White: Yo Kagen 5 dan (at the time)

Black: Kato Masao 9 dan

Played in 1991 at the Nihon Ki-in, Ichigaya, Tokyo.

Komi: 5½ points

Analysis from Kido, Supplimental Booklet, April 2000, by Yo Kagen 8 dan.

Yo Kagen 8 dan introduced this game by saying that he played against Kato for the first time here, when he was just 21 years old. And he was amazed that he won the game! First time playing Kato, and getting his first win against his great opponent. However, he goes on to say that he lost all of the next seven encounters with Kato that he played up to the time of this analysis of the game!

Regardless of that, it is interesting to see how he won against one of the greatest players of all time.

Question 1 An Unusual Attachment

image

Black to Play

Kato Sensei is playing Black. When the three point pincer of White 6 is played, the attachment of White 8 and drawing-back to 10 is unusual.

What is Black’s strongest answer?

Show Answer

Question 2 A Move One Wants to Play to See What Happens

image

White to Play

Black can play to recover the single stone in the corner, but that is not a priority [so White need not rush to ensure the capture]. Before that, there is a move one wants to play to see what will happen.

Show Answer

Question 3 The Only Move to Make Shape

image

White to Play

Black has just pincered with the marked stone. Having White’s two stones swallowed up would not be good, so the only move for White to play is to run away. The question is the method to use.

What may be said to be the only move here in regards to shape?

Here again I knew what the answer would be, but it just looked weird to me. So I went with my gut instinct and failed again!.

Show Answer

Question 4 Giving Chase

image

Black to Play

This time it is Black to play. Falling in line with White’s intention to play lightly to make sabaki to deal with the situation would not be good. Please give chase with a severe sequence of moves.

Show Answer

Question 5 Whether Good or Bad

image

White to Play

Playing the atari felt good, but White’s shape is still filled with defects. I had no hope at all that White’s stones could be settled without problems. White cannot discard the two marked stones. Here, whether good or bad…

Once again I was eager to see what White could possibly come up with. And I was astounded when I saw the move that was played! It shows how the perception of professional go players is different from amateurs. However, I am also a chess player, so I remember what the great Latvian player, Mikhail Tal used to say when he had more than one piece hanging: “The opponent can only take one piece at a time!”

Show Answer

Good Moves Making Bad Shape

In the lower right, a joseki was played that is good for Black. The attachment of Black 25 and ballooning out move of 29 were good moves that made bad shape. It seems that using White 26 to extend at 33 would have been safe and sound.

image

Figure 1 (1-37)
Those interested in replaying the game move by move can click here to do so.

Before Capturing…

Black 45 should have been played at A to fill a liberty to emphasize the attack. Besides that, before capturing with Black 63, Black should have exchanged the move at B for White C. After Black captures at 63, White would not answer the Black forcing move of B.

image

Figure 2 (38-65)

The Tables are Turned in the Board Position

Black must have made some kind of miscalculation that led him to play 79 and 81. White gets thick and strong with the moves through 90, while making settled shape in the lower left corner, and this turned the tables in the position across the board.

image

Figure 3 (66-100)

White is Rocked

In the upper left, Black played a series of do-or-die moves. This spirited play overwhelmed White. White should have played 38 as the hane at A. Furthermore, White 40 should have been played at A.

image

Figure 4 (101-147)

A Reasonable Division [of Profit and Thickness]

In response to White’s cutting and capturing Black’s stones with 48 through 58, Black was able to play 57 through 61, so this was a reasonable division [of thickness and profit in this position]. This made calculating the territories on the board easier.

image

Figure 5 (148-200) Black 73 takes kō (below 66); White 98, same

First Game, First Win

In the end, Kato Sensei resigned. I was floating on air, so happy at winning that first game.

image

Figure 6 (201-240) White 8 takes kō (to the right of 5); Black 11, same (5)

Those who wish to comment on the opinions expressed here may send their thoughts to info@GoWizardry.com. The most interesting responses will be addressed in future postings.

Robert J. Terry

Tagged as: , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Books

takemija_bookcover

Imagination of a Go Master, Logic Shattering Cosmic Go

Takemiya has selected ten of his games against leading go players and formatted them into a collection of problems designed to illustrate his famous cosmic style.

Buy this Book at Amazon

Go For Everyone

Go For Everyone

A New Method for Learning to Play the Game of Go

Buy this book

Book Cover

Journey to the West

This is a semi-autobiographical novel that depicts a unique American success story; a rags to riches tale of a man escaping his humble origins to make millions of dollars, but then he throws it all away due to the ancient character flaw of hubris.

Buy this Book at Amazon